Académie des Beaux-Arts
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The royal Academie's

The Royal Academy of Painting

27 January 1648 :

The young Louis XIV authorises official court painter Charles Le Brun to establish a Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture independent of the powerful heads of the Guild of St Luke. This vital decision finally sets the artist apart from the craftsman. 
Initially comprising a dozen "elders" led by Le Brun, the new Academy is accorded the official protection of Chancellor Séguier.

1655 :

The Academy is taken under the protection of Cardinal Mazarin and opens membership to engravers. 

1663 :

The Academy opens its doors to all, talent and good character being the only criteria: 14 women are admitted and Antoine Coypel becomes a member at the age of 20. With its official seat at the Louvre, the Academy now includes up to 180 members, called on by the charter to decorate the premises and show their works there. 

1666 :

At the urging of Lebrun and Colbert, the French Academy in Rome is established. It is the direct ancestor of today's Villa Médicis, acquired in 1804.

1673 :

The Academy exhibits to the public for the first time, foreshadowing the Salons of the future. From 1725 onwards this annual temporary exhibition takes place in the square reception room in the Louvre.

21 August 1791 :

With excluded artists expressing their discontent, an official decree forces the Royal Academies to admit them. 

August  1793 :

The Convention closes all academies and learned societies.



The Royal Academy of Music

28 June 1669 :

The Royal Academy of Music is founded at Colbert's instigation, following the principles laid down by the composer Pierre Perrin. Lully becomes director in 1672. Its role is to produce light entertainment in French for the Court, to arouse public interest in music and to ensure a high standard of music teaching. Until 1793 it collaborates on the creation of librettos with the French Academy and the Academy of Literature.

August 1793 :

The Convention closes all academies and learned societies.

The Royal Academy of Architecture

30 decembre 1671 :

The Royal Academy of Architecture is established by royal command and at the instigation of Colbert and the architect François Blondel, first head of the new body.

1720 :

The Academy, whose members include the kingdom's most famous architects, creates an architecture prize of a visit to Rome.

August 1793 :

The Convention closes all academies and learned societies.

 

 

 

 

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